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Jack Yan & Associates

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Encouraging greater public transport use: give people the tools they want, says Yan

Wellington, July 24 (JY&A Media) Mayoral candidate Jack Yan believes that opening up Wellington’s public data, especially for transport, can play a role in innovation and economic diversification, as part of a greater plan to build the city’s economy. ‘Opening up Metlink data,’ he says, ‘would encourage greater public transport usage for a start.’
   He says that by providing public data, Wellington developers to create apps and other programs. He identifies the real-time information used by Metlink as a prime candidate, from which a Wellington company can use the data for live maps of where buses and trains are, helping commuters and encouraging greater use of public transport.
   ‘We can encourage greater use of public transport if people have tools that appeal to them,’ he says. ‘People want predictability, and the ability to plan their day. Right now, we still don’t have enough when it comes to public transport.’
   Mr Yan is in favour of opening more of the city’s data to the public, and points to a competition in Maine earlier in June where netizens took public data and created projects to help the community.
   ‘Opening up data can not only show off our creative abilities as a city, but bring people together,’ he says. ‘It’s a small part of a much wider plan.
   ‘We can innovate and ensure that everything that the city currently measures with water and power usage is made public, so our best and brightest minds can come up with conservation and energy solutions.
   ‘We keep saying we are the creative capital, yet we don’t seem to tap in to this very creativity,’ he says.
   Mr Yan says that with more older voters than younger voters, some of the fresh ideas to make our services more appealing to “wired” users have been ignored by some candidates. ‘They are under a mistaken belief that older voters would not find such ideas useful, or they are choosing to ignore younger voters because they do not provide enough votes.’
   He says, ‘The best ideas have the potential to go global, and similar ones in New Zealand’s past—such as the computer graphics used to track America’s Cup entrants or TV weather maps—have gone on to be export earners for us.’
   Apps are already a major export earner for New Zealand presently.
   Other public data should be made available, he says, including public documents that currently are only available to citizens with official information requests. ‘They should be searchable, too,’ says Mr Yan. ‘The cost of putting them online is far lower than printing them out and posting them to people.’
   He says that if Wellington is to be a creative capital, it needs to get its fundamentals right.
   Mr Yan’s manifesto features more ideas on transparency and transport.
   He was the first mayoral candidate to publish a manifesto in April on his website (http://jackyan.com or http://backjack2013.com). It has a 10-point plan on kick-starting Wellington’s economy. He is the only candidate regularly conducting international business, with a strong entrepreneurial record, and has formally mentored Wellington businesses since 2006.
   In 2010, he had campaigned on free wifi for the inner city and waterfront, now a reality and used by a record number of people in Wellington.

Note to editors
This release may be viewed online at http://jyanet.com/info/2013/07/encouraging-greater-public-transport-use-give-people-the-tools-they-want-says-yan/.

Images
Jack Yan
Publicity shot for Jack Yan’s mayoral campaign (2013)
http://jackyan.com
JPEG, 2·83 Mbyte
Photographed by Mikhail Ruzhanskiy

Additional images may be downloaded from http://jyanet.com/press/photo.htm.

About Jack Yan
Jack Yan founded Jack Yan & Associates (http://jya.net), one of the world’s first virtual firms, in 1987, operating internationally. Among his company’s interests are business consulting, imaging, software and media, including the fashion magazine brand Lucire. He writes on topics, ranging from branding and business responsibility to fashion and typography, in numerous publications and journals worldwide and is a regular international speaker. He serves on the editorial board for The Journal of Brand Management. He has authored or co-authored numerous books, including Beyond Branding, Typography and Branding and, most recently, Nation Branding: Country Concepts and Cases. His personal site is at jackyan.com. He is a director of the Medinge Group (http://medinge.org), a think-tank in Sweden devoted to cutting-edge branding. He was one of the parties behind the successful bid for Miss Sweden in 2003 for Panos Emporio, and is general counsel of the Miss New Zealand Consortium, the New Zealand licensee for Miss Universe. Since 2006, he has been a mentor with Business Mentors New Zealand. In 2013, he announced his second bid for the mayoralty in Wellington, New Zealand, after netting 12 per cent of the vote on his first attempt.

Contacts
Jack Yan
T 64 4 387-3213
E jack.yan@jyanet.com

Hamish McConnochie
Campaign Media Manager
C 64 27 772-4391
E hamish@jackyanformayor.org

###

July 23, 2013   No Comments

Jack Yan expected to talk of unity and internal cultural change at mayoral campaign function

Wellington, July 17 (JY&A Media) Mayoral candidate Jack Yan will take the opportunity of his campaign hui at Soi, at Greta Pt, tonight to talk of his themes of growing Wellington and unity.
   Mr Yan talks not just of developing the economy—his 10-point growth plan and his entire manifesto have been available for public scrutiny since April—but of promoting cultural change within council, if elected.
   He claims that with his experience in international business and effecting cultural changes through rebranding, he can improve the relationship the council has with its officers.
   Having already established a good rapport with Hutt City Mayor Ray Wallace—as with Mr Yan, a St Mark’s old boy—he says he is looking forward to getting on similar terms with Upper Hutt Mayor Wayne Guppy and Porirua Mayor Nick Leggett, as well as WCC CEO Kevin Lavery.
   Mr Yan will also touch on transparency, to ensure that all public WCC documents are easily searchable, and pledges to remain accessible to the public via social networks and in person, as he has done ‘for the last six years’.
   In an advance copy of his speech, he says, ‘Since the local government reforms of 1989, the majority of Wellington mayors have not been former councillors, and were able to unite their councils. I have established relationships with most councillors equally over the years, and we can have a united council, one which will get things done for the people of Wellington.
   ‘My campaign team is made up of left and right, united with a passion for Wellington. It is almost a microcosm of the views expressed at council and a demonstration of what this city can do when leadership inspires and plays to individuals’ strengths.’
   The hui, which will see campaign supporters such as former mayor Sir Michael Fowler and former Miss Universe New Zealand Samantha Lochhead in attendance, will be giving 10 per cent of its proceeds to CanTeen, the only New Zealand organization that supports young people aged 13–24 living with cancer. A fashion show styled by Lucire fashion editor Sopheak Seng and directed by James Butters, and a live auction, will take place.

Note to editors
This release may be viewed online at http://jyanet.com/info/2013/07/jack-yan-expected-to-talk-of-unity-and-internal-cultural-change-at-mayoral-campaign-function/. A post-event release will be issued. It is the campaign’s wish to support CanTeen. This does not imply an endorsement by CanTeen of Jack Yan’s mayoral bid.

Images
Jack Yan
Publicity shot for Jack Yan’s mayoral campaign (2013)
http://jackyan.com
JPEG, 2·83 Mbyte
Photographed by Mikhail Ruzhanskiy

Additional images may be downloaded from http://jyanet.com/press/photo.htm.

About Jack Yan
Jack Yan founded Jack Yan & Associates (http://jya.net), one of the world’s first virtual firms, in 1987, operating internationally. Among his company’s interests are business consulting, imaging, software and media, including the fashion magazine brand Lucire. He writes on topics, ranging from branding and business responsibility to fashion and typography, in numerous publications and journals worldwide and is a regular international speaker. He serves on the editorial board for The Journal of Brand Management. He has authored or co-authored numerous books, including Beyond Branding, Typography and Branding and, most recently, Nation Branding: Country Concepts and Cases. His personal site is at jackyan.com. He is a director of the Medinge Group (http://medinge.org), a think-tank in Sweden devoted to cutting-edge branding. He was one of the parties behind the successful bid for Miss Sweden in 2003 for Panos Emporio, and is general counsel of the Miss New Zealand Consortium, the New Zealand licensee for Miss Universe. Since 2006, he has been a mentor with Business Mentors New Zealand. In 2013, he announced his second bid for the mayoralty in Wellington, New Zealand, after netting 12 per cent of the vote on his first attempt.

Contacts
Jack Yan
T 64 4 387-3213
E jack.yan@jyanet.com

Hamish McConnochie
Campaign Media Manager
C 64 27 772-4391
E hamish@jackyanformayor.org

###

July 16, 2013   No Comments

Miss Universe New Zealand prepares for a final push, with a record number already entered

Auckland, June 20 (JY&A Media) Miss Universe has just announced that the world final will be held in Moscow, Russia in November. The winner form New Zealand will be representing the country at that competition and so the organizers behind Miss Universe New Zealand are reminding any girls who would still like to enter that the cut-off date of July 1 is fast approaching.
   A record number of young women have already entered the competition this year, say the organizers. It will also return to television for the first time in 21 years, with a broadcast on Juice TV later this year.
   Entrants can head to the official website at www.nextmissnz.com.
   ‘We’ve really proud that we’ve been able to bring a new energy to Miss Universe New Zealand, and we know from all the feedback that the public is excited about what we have in store,’ says executive producer Nigel Godfrey, who is currently working on the Miss Universe Red Carpet Gala which will comprise both a Variety Spectacular and the Live Final of the competition.
   The crown, designed by Anita du Plessis-Dutton of Aqua Jewels Ltd., will adorn the winner of the 2013 competition, which will be held in Auckland later this year.
   ‘We have noticed first-hand how people are responding to the new team behind Miss Universe New Zealand, and our social media engagement, on Facebook and Instagram, has been the best in the competition’s history,’ notes national director Evana Patterson.
   ‘It’s only the tip of the iceberg,’ says Jack Yan, general counsel for Miss Universe New Zealand. ‘Not only are we seeing the brand revitalized this year, returning to TV after 21 years’ absence, it is 30 years since Lorraine Downes became New Zealand’s only winner at Miss Universe. It’s an auspicious year, and there’s even more to come.’
   The organizers say that they will make announcements over major sponsors in the upcoming weeks, as well as details of the semifinalists from around the country.

Images
Images for this release can be downloaded from http://jyanet.com/press/photo.htm.

Note to editors
The Miss Universe name, the ‘woman with the stars’ symbol, and Miss Universe New Zealand are registered trade marks of Miss Universe LP, LLLP, and used by the Miss New Zealand Consortium under licence.

About Nigel Godfrey
In 1990 TVNZ made Nigel an offer he couldn’t refuse and he moved to New Zealand. After a few years with TVNZ and a stint in Christchurch with New Zealand’s first regional broadcaster CTV, he returned to Auckland and in 1995 he founded Eureka Productions.
   The last 18 years has seen Nigel and Eureka produce hundreds of hours of broadcast television programming on both sides of the Tasman. Some of the highlights: the children’s show Y for Channel 9 in Australia, Sky’s coverage of the international première of The Lord of the Rings: the Return of the King, interviewing Stephen Fry, ‘Crocodile Hunter’ Steve Irwin, Lee Tamahori, Robson Green and many others, whilst producing 120 episodes of Sky Scene for Sky TV.
   In 2009, Nigel produced the first Telethon that New Zealand had seen in 20 years, raising $2 million dollars for underprivileged children. In 2010 Nigel staged and produced for television The New Zealand Variety Show, a star-studded Kiwi version of the UK’s Royal Variety Show. Nigel has worked with TVNZ and TV3 on Masterchef, Idol, Stars in Their Eyes, So You Think You Can Dance?, Deal or No Deal and countless other prime-time franchises. He has also produced and directed a wide range of TV commercials with, amongst others, Trinny and Susannah, Gorden Kaye and Sir Michael Caine.
   Nigel is also well known as an actor both on stage and in front of the camera. He has starred in The Phantom of the Opera and in 2011 he returned to the stage as Moonface Martin in the multi-million dollar Auckland revival of Anything Goes. He has appeared in five feature films, sharing the screen with Jon Voight, John Hurt, David Strathairn and, most recently, a rather large ape. He has also guest-starred in around 15 TV series including Hercules: the Legendary Journeys, Xena: Warrior Princess, Legend of the Seeker and Power Rangers. He has also taken the “hero” role in around 35 commercials including a wildly successful US campaign entitled We Are the Champions for a certain little blue pill. He also produces a number of large-scale events including the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Awards.

About Evana Patterson
Evana Patterson has been involved in the world of modelling in New Zealand for well over a decade. She has worked as a model, worked inside a model agency and has directed numerous fashion shoots. Evana has been a well respected professional make-up artist for nearly 13 years, graduating from the Cut Above Academy in 2000. She is currently the make-up artist for Max Factor having won their nationwide search for Make-up Artist of the Year. Evana also works as the show choreographer with World TV for the annual Miss Chinese Cosmos and Miss Chinese New Zealand competitions. When she can she also enjoys giving her time as a make-up artist for the Look Good, Feel Better Charity.
   As if all of the above isn’t enough to keep her busy, she is also a respected fitness instructor, personal trainer, sports nutrition consultant, and Mum to 18-month-old Mila.

About Jack Yan
Jack Yan founded Jack Yan & Associates (http://jya.net), one of the world’s first virtual firms, in 1987, operating internationally. Among his company’s interests are business consulting, imaging, software and media, including the fashion magazine brand Lucire, which is published internationally in print and online formats. He writes on topics, ranging from branding and business responsibility to fashion and typography, in numerous publications and journals worldwide and is a regular international speaker. He serves on the editorial board for The Journal of Brand Management. He has authored or co-authored numerous books, including Beyond Branding, Typography and Branding and, most recently, Nation Branding: Country Concepts and Cases. His personal site is at jackyan.com. He is a director of the Medinge Group (http://medinge.org), a think-tank in Sweden devoted to cutting-edge branding. He was one of the parties behind the successful bid for Miss Sweden in 2003 for Panos Emporio. In 2010, he ran a strong but unsuccessful campaign for Mayor of Wellington, New Zealand, netting 12 per cent of the vote on his first attempt.

Contacts
Nigel Godfrey
Executive Producer Miss Universe New Zealand
+64 21 630-443
nigel@nextmissnz.com

###

June 19, 2013   No Comments

Jack Yan hears Wellingtonians' alcohol policy concerns first-hand

Wellington, June 19 (JY&A Media) Wellington City mayoral candidate Jack Yan last night heard the concerns of Wellingtonians around the city’s draft alcohol policy by working behind the bar at Dragonfly.
   ‘Like all Wellingtonians, I’ve witnessed what the city can be like on a busy Friday or Saturday night, but engaging with citizens gives you an even clearer picture,’ he says.
   ‘The Wellingtonians I spoke to last night believe that early closings were tantamount to punishing the majority for the misdeeds of a small minority.’
   Mr Yan served drinks at Dragonfly on Courtenay Place alongside co-owner Brent Wong and bar staff, talking to locals through the evening.
   Fresh from the launch of Martin Crowe’s autobiography Raw were Mr Crowe himself and his wife, image consultant and former Miss Universe Lorraine Downes, who came to support Mr Yan.
   He says that when attending a WCC meeting last week, where many interested parties gave presentations, there was a sense of strongly opposing views. He was more interested, however, at getting to the core of the problem.
   ‘At the meeting, we hadn’t heard presentations from everyday punters, nor did we hear from the Health Promotion Agency, and these were seemingly obvious gaps that I felt had to be addressed,’ he says.
   Mr Yan says that he accepts a lot of the views of those who presented, from the need for better public transportation after hours and a greater police presence, and keeping the centre of Wellington vibrant. He says he has also read the City Council’s own residents’ survey on the role of alcohol.
   The balance must come, he says, from the city working with central government agencies on programmes to discourage “pre-loading”, and using the council’s discretion on punishing only irresponsible bar owners.
   ‘We seem to want to punish all bar owners because that discretion has not been exercised,’ he says. ‘We are a small enough city to be able to target individuals rather than entire precincts.’
   He adds, ‘The presentation from Dr Stephen Palmer at Regional Public Health indicates a causal link between pre-loading and the alcohol-related incidents recorded by the hospital.
   ‘What each side seemed to disagree on was the percentage of “pre-loaders”, though they all agreed it was happening and that it was undesirable. It’s a good place to start.
   ‘I realize the police are concerned that the bars are a magnet for young people but that is more a consequence of successful marketing by the venues, something that we should not discourage if we are to maintain the hospitality sector in our city.’
   Mr Yan says that the marketing efforts of bars tended to target all audiences, including visitors to the city.
   Closing them early would shift drinking to different areas in Wellington where police could find it harder to patrol and identify criminals.
   He says he would, if elected later this year, encourage partnering with police on crime prevention as a way of reducing the rate of offences after 3 a.m. and to ensure residents in the inner city have a safer and cleaner environment.
   For events where a higher number of hospital admissions are recorded, such as the Sevens, Mr Yan believes that partnering with programmes such as the HPA’s present ‘Yeah nah’ campaign in the lead-up as well as attracting better entertainment acts would reduce crime, emergencies, and associated social costs.
   However, Mr Yan maintains, as he did in 2010, that the antisocial elements of the drinking culture stems in part from citizens feeling concerned for their futures, and especially about the economy.
   ‘We don’t engage elements of our population on the direction this city should move in. We aren’t having a conversation with, say, younger people, or with our Māori and Pacific populations. I don’t see it as any surprise that we can so readily identify at-risk groups.
   ‘Much of this has come from treating people differently and even excluding their voices altogether,’ he says. ‘Certain elements in the establishment are not setting an example and we are approaching drunkenness both with acceptability and as bravado.
   ‘It’s why I felt it was important to be the only candidate to publish a comprehensive manifesto and a 10-point plan on getting our economy moving, as part of generating dialogue.’
   He believes the compromise position that was presented by the Hospitality Association of a shift in licensing hours, coupled with greater cooperation between the police, the Association and WCC officers on identifying trouble spots, would help, but warns that it must come with real change in this year’s local body elections.
   The Wellington City Council will begin consultation on its alcohol management strategy and draft local alcohol policy on July 2.

Note to editors
This release may be viewed online at http://jyanet.com/info/2013/06/jack-yan-hears-wellingtonians-alcohol-policy-concerns-first-hand/.

Images
Jack Yan, Lorraine Downes and Martin Crowe
Jack Yan, Miss Universe 1983 Lorraine Downes, and cricket legend Martin Crowe, at Dragonfly after the launch of Raw and on Jack’s campaign trail (2013)
http://jackyan.com
JPEG, 284 kbyte
Photographed by Hamish McConnochie

Jack Yan
Publicity shot for Jack Yan’s mayoral campaign (2013)
http://jackyan.com
JPEG, 2·83 Mbyte
Photographed by Mikhail Ruzhanskiy

Additional images may be downloaded from http://jyanet.com/press/photo.htm.

Videos
A short video from the evening, directed by Isaac Cleland and edited by Lawrance Simpson, can be found at https://vimeo.com/68679891.

About Jack Yan
Jack Yan founded Jack Yan & Associates (http://jya.net), one of the world’s first virtual firms, in 1987, operating internationally. Among his company’s interests are business consulting, imaging, software and media, including the fashion magazine brand Lucire. He writes on topics, ranging from branding and business responsibility to fashion and typography, in numerous publications and journals worldwide and is a regular international speaker. He serves on the editorial board for The Journal of Brand Management. He has authored or co-authored numerous books, including Beyond Branding, Typography and Branding and, most recently, Nation Branding: Country Concepts and Cases. His personal site is at jackyan.com. He is a director of the Medinge Group (http://medinge.org), a think-tank in Sweden devoted to cutting-edge branding. He was one of the parties behind the successful bid for Miss Sweden in 2003 for Panos Emporio, and is general counsel of the Miss New Zealand Consortium, the New Zealand licensee for Miss Universe. Since 2006, he has been a mentor with Business Mentors New Zealand. In 2013, he announced his second bid for the mayoralty in Wellington, New Zealand, after netting 12 per cent of the vote on his first attempt.

Contacts
Jack Yan
T 64 4 387-3213
E jack.yan@jyanet.com

Hamish McConnochie
Campaign Media Manager
C 64 27 772-4391
E hamish@jackyanformayor.org

###

June 19, 2013   1 Comment

Ten points to get Wellington's economy going: Jack Yan's manifesto is in line with the demands of the city's business sector

Wellington, June 12 (JY&A Media) Wellington City mayoral candidate Jack Yan has released his ten-point plan to get Wellington’s economy moving in the right direction. Mr Yan says he’s adopted the ten-point plan to clearly communicate his intentions if elected.
   Mr Yan argues that Wellington should be the home of intellectual capital in New Zealand, and the source of world-class thinking, products and services.
   The points are as follows.

Wellington as a global hub for innovation
Based on his experience in his own career in international business, innovation can help diversify the city’s economy and, in some cases, create frictionless exports and high-value jobs. Mr Yan says he does not want to see the capital part of a “race to the bottom” with low-wage jobs where Wellingtonians could see their roles easily taken over by cheap, third-world nations.

Identifying our next export champions and high-growth firms, and supporting them
Mr Yan says it is possible to use rigorous criteria to identify the next high-growth firms and promote them at an international level. He is prepared to work with Grow Wellington and Tourism Wellington on a concerted campaign. He also notes that his global connections and his multilingualism as being up to the task of promoting Wellington internationally.

International links to Wellington
‘Wellington can put forward a very compelling case as a hub for the country, and we can work with existing airlines to ensure that it’s going to be a win for them, too,’ says Mr Yan. Coupled with his second point above, he believes he can open doors for airlines in new markets, and can call on his experience in Asia and Europe.
   ‘I am heartened to note that this policy has been taken up by the city officially, but it’s going to take the right person to drive it, preferably someone who has the right experience in building bridges between cultures,’ he says.

Connecting our business leaders internationally
Mr Yan’s belief that cities are the drivers of globalization as much as nations means that he is prepared to network Wellington businesses with others abroad, either to help them expand, or to see them create new innovations through collaboration. He has worked in that very space himself, and has mentored local businesses since 2006.

A tech precinct
Not everything can be done in a virtual vacuum. As in 2010, Mr Yan believes in creative clusters, and says that a technological precinct from upper Cuba Street down to Cambridge Terrace would be an ideal spot. It would also help focus research and development for Wellington to create more intellectual capital along with world-class products and services. His earlier proposal for an inner-city park ties in with the precinct as place-branding experts that he has worked with believe that there must be a proper work–life balance in modern cities.

Critical mass for research and development
Mr Yan believes Wellington needs to promote stronger links with Victoria University for a start, and ensure there is a critical mass for research and development in the city. He already has fostered connections with Massey University and Whitireia Polytechnic, and is prepared to build on them further to ensure economic diversity and world-class thinking.

Collaboration
Wellington’s culture already invites collaboration. When introducing Promoki at Lightning Lab’s Demo Day in May, Mr Yan noted that there was an international mixture of entrepreneurs in the city. Promoting a sense of a global community through programmes that encourage collaboration among businesses will ensure that Wellingtonians create globally minded, properly differentiated and competitive products and services.

Improving our technological infrastructure
If Wellington is to invest in infrastructure, there must be a proper return on investment. While Mr Yan does not believe the city should be focused on a single sector, he says that the technological infrastructure—he campaigned successfully for free wifi in 2010—can be enhanced.
   ‘Extending the free wifi service, opening up public data, and making greater investment in the tech infrastructure would signal to international firms that Wellington is open for business and attract inward investment. It would further allow local firms to innovate and potentially create technologically savvy new products,’ he says.
   Mr Yan says the earlier kickstart on the tech sector in the 1990s under Mayor Mark Blumsky already netted innovators such as Xero and Silverstripe. The Rosebuddy recommendation engine is a newer Wellington innovation which has a huge potential to grow in the 2010s.

A regional view of Wellington
Mr Yan is in favour of regional reform but while Wellington remains separate, he says he already has a good relationship with Hutt City Mayor Ray Wallace and looks forward to connecting to the region’s other mayors if elected. His history of collaboration and an ability to work toward a long-term vision equips him to work with others on creating a vibrant, strong region. He regrets that the Wairarapa has decided to go it alone, but believes that there is potential to work closely with the district when it comes to primary products.

Getting investment for Wellington
Mr Yan says the right investment needs to come in to the city for sustainable, long-term jobs, and that the city ‘cannot be reliant on a cap-in-hand attitude with central government.’ He believes central government will only be attracted to Wellington if the earlier points can be achieved compellingly, and that he has the experience to secure further investment at an international level.

   With more contenders in the mayoral race, Jack Yan remains the only candidate who has published a manifesto. The 10 points were first detailed in his manifesto in April, when Mr Yan declared his intention to challenge incumbent Celia Wade-Brown for the mayoralty. Since then, he has noticed one idea already taken up in part—his plan to extend Wellington Airport’s runway and to ensure an airline comes to the region to use it as a hub—while the remaining nine continue his themes of innovation and economic development.

Note to editors
This release may be viewed online at http://jyanet.com/info/2013/06/ten-points-to-get-wellingtons-economy-going-jack-yans-manifesto-is-in-line-with-the-demands-of-the-citys-business-sector/.

Images
Jack Yan
Publicity shot for Jack Yan’s mayoral campaign (2013)
http://jackyan.com
JPEG, 2·83 Mbyte
Photographed by Mikhail Ruzhanskiy

Additional images may be downloaded from http://jyanet.com/press/photo.htm.

About Jack Yan
Jack Yan founded Jack Yan & Associates (http://jya.net), one of the world’s first virtual firms, in 1987, operating internationally. Among his company’s interests are business consulting, imaging, software and media, including the fashion magazine brand Lucire. He writes on topics, ranging from branding and business responsibility to fashion and typography, in numerous publications and journals worldwide and is a regular international speaker. He serves on the editorial board for The Journal of Brand Management. He has authored or co-authored numerous books, including Beyond Branding, Typography and Branding and, most recently, Nation Branding: Country Concepts and Cases. His personal site is at jackyan.com. He is a director of the Medinge Group (http://medinge.org), a think-tank in Sweden devoted to cutting-edge branding. He was one of the parties behind the successful bid for Miss Sweden in 2003 for Panos Emporio, and is general counsel of the Miss New Zealand Consortium, the New Zealand licensee for Miss Universe. Since 2006, he has been a mentor with Business Mentors New Zealand. In 2013, he announced his second bid for the mayoralty in Wellington, New Zealand, after netting 12 per cent of the vote on his first attempt.

Contacts
Jack Yan
T 64 4 387-3213
E jack.yan@jyanet.com

Hamish McConnochie
Campaign Media Manager
C 64 27 772-4391
E hamish@jackyanformayor.org

###

June 11, 2013   1 Comment

Mayoral candidate Jack Yan calls for new Cuba Street park

Wellington, May 27 (JY&A Media) Wellington City mayoral candidate Jack Yan says if he is elected, he will move to see the establishment of a new inner-city park on Cuba Street.
   The Wellington City Council’s 2012–22 long-term plan budgets for NZ$3·2 million to be spent on new inner-city park space and Mr Yan proposes that the money be spent on Cuba Street.
   ‘Ideally, I would like to see Council invest in a new park on the present Wilson car park next to Swan Lane on Cuba Street.
   ‘The site receives a large amount of sun and Cuba Street has high foot traffic. There is also a large number of apartment buildings in the area, with further developments, such as the INK Apartments on Ghuznee Street planned. It’s a natural fit.
   ‘A park space here will make Cuba Street an even more attractive destination. This will help bring businesses back to the street, which have been turned away through earthquake strengthening concerns.’
   Mr Yan says that the space will also encourage greater collaboration between Wellingtonians, who will find it a useful meeting-place.
   He says if elected later this year, he will work energetically with other councillors to direct officers to evaluate this and other sites for an inner city park.
   Mr Yan says it is part of a longer-term revitalization plan that he envisions for the Cuba Quarter, which he believes has great technological and development potential.
   ‘It’s been a while since a new inner city green space has been created and during this time, the inner city population has continued to rise. Inner city residents, workers and visitors, all need somewhere outdoors where they can relax.’

Summary
• Mayoral candidate Jack Yan says he will move to see the Council construct a new inner-city park on the Wilson car park site on Swan Lane and Cuba Street.
• WCC has already budgeted NZ$3·2 million for a new park
• Mr Yan believes construction of a park on Cuba Street will help reverse the trend on Cuba Street of businesses moving elsewhere.
• WCC’s capital value for the site is NZ$1¼ million

Images
Images for this release may be downloaded from http://jyanet.com/press/photo.htm.

About Jack Yan
Jack Yan founded Jack Yan & Associates (http://jya.net), one of the world’s first virtual firms, in 1987, operating internationally. Among his company’s interests are business consulting, imaging, software and media, including the fashion magazine brand Lucire. He writes on topics, ranging from branding and business responsibility to fashion and typography, in numerous publications and journals worldwide and is a regular international speaker. He serves on the editorial board for The Journal of Brand Management. He has authored or co-authored numerous books, including Beyond Branding, Typography and Branding and, most recently, Nation Branding: Country Concepts and Cases. His personal site is at jackyan.com. He is a director of the Medinge Group (http://medinge.org), a think-tank in Sweden devoted to cutting-edge branding. He was one of the parties behind the successful bid for Miss Sweden in 2003 for Panos Emporio, and is general counsel of the Miss New Zealand Consortium, the New Zealand licensee for Miss Universe. Since 2006, he has been a mentor with Business Mentors New Zealand. In 2013, he announced his second bid for the mayoralty in Wellington, New Zealand, after netting 12 per cent of the vote on his first attempt.

Contacts
Jack Yan
T 64 4 387-3213
E jack.yan@jyanet.com

Hamish McConnochie
Campaign Media Manager
C 64 27 772-4391
E hamish@jackyanformayor.org

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May 27, 2013   No Comments

New Wellington beauty brand gives back to Africa Day events this week

Wellington, May 23 (JY&A Media) As Wellington gears up to Africa Day this Saturday, with a 12-hour celebration at the Wellington Town Hall beginning at 11.30 a.m., there’s a distinctively non-African name behind the scenes doing the make-up for the fashion show on the day, as well as the smaller Taste of Africa event at Te Papa from 6 p.m. tonight (May 23).
   Kareen D. Holland, whose business KD One (http://www.kdone.co.nz) recently opened at Morrison Kent House on The Terrace, is applying her extensive experience in film make-up to the community event.
   KD One’s 100 per cent natural skin care and cosmetics stemmed from Ms Holland’s years in film, working with such luminaries as Weta’s Sir Richard Taylor.
   Working at Taste of Africa and Africa Day is Ms Holland’s way of giving back to the community, something she was keen to do ever since KD One opened last month.
   Africa Day showcases African culture through dance, music, arts, crafts and cuisine. Artists, musicians and cultural groups with an African connection in the New Zealand community will perform throughout the day, as well as the fashion shows that KD One has worked on.
   It is the first major cultural event for African communities in Wellington.
   KD One benefited from mentoring under Wellington mayoral candidate Jack Yan, who advised Ms Holland from 2012 as part of his work with Business Mentors New Zealand.

About KD One
KD One was formed by Kareen Holland, a successful and award-winning make-up artist in the international television and film industry for the last 23 years. Kareen has worked on productions such as Xena: Princess Warrior, Spartacus: Blood and Sand, The Strip and many other larger films. KD One has created a range of instinctively natural skin care and cosmetics which are perfect for people who are concerned about parabens, petrochemicals and synthetic ingredients, ingredient–product traceability and the effect of products on your health and the environment.

About Jack Yan
Jack Yan founded Jack Yan & Associates (http://jya.net), one of the world’s first virtual firms, in 1987, operating internationally. Among his company’s interests are business consulting, imaging, software and media, including the fashion magazine brand Lucire. He writes on topics, ranging from branding and business responsibility to fashion and typography, in numerous publications and journals worldwide and is a regular international speaker. He serves on the editorial board for The Journal of Brand Management. He has authored or co-authored numerous books, including Beyond Branding, Typography and Branding and, most recently, Nation Branding: Country Concepts and Cases. His personal site is at jackyan.com. He is a director of the Medinge Group (http://medinge.org), a think-tank in Sweden devoted to cutting-edge branding. He was one of the parties behind the successful bid for Miss Sweden in 2003 for Panos Emporio, and is general counsel of the Miss New Zealand Consortium, the New Zealand licensee for Miss Universe. Since 2006, he has been a mentor with Business Mentors New Zealand. In 2013, he announced his second bid for the mayoralty in Wellington, New Zealand, after netting 12 per cent of the vote on his first attempt.

Contact
Kareen Holland
T 64 4 473-1239 or 64 21 069-7940
http://www.kdone.co.nz/contact-us.html

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May 22, 2013   No Comments

Lucire's modelling competition gets social media boost through Promoki

Wellington, May 17 (JY&A Media) With two weeks left to go, Promoki’s ‘Made to Model’ contest for international fashion magazine Lucire is the Wellington start-up’s most engaged competition, which can be found at http://lucire.promoki.com.
   Announced in late April, Promoki launched a modelling photo contest with the magazine, where the winner is the party with the most likes and shares.
   Promoki is one of the hottest start-ups and a participant in Wellington’s Lightning Lab.
   Lucire publisher Jack Yan says that it was natural that his magazine (at http://lucire.com), which was the first commercial online fashion publication in New Zealand 16 years ago, would work jointly with another innovative firm.
   In the weeks so far, Mr Yan says he is delighted with the results.
   ‘Promoki’s challenge is very of-the-moment and harnesses the power of social media to decide who the winner is. It’s innovative, transparent, and very powerful for participating brands,’ he says.
   ‘We’ve been thrilled to see more people engaging with Lucire on Facebook and Twitter and there’s a good amount of netizens out there excited about the competition.’
   Promoki CEO Brinkley Warren says, ‘It’s been really exciting to see the big social media spike for Lucire. Tapping into the power of crowd creativity is good for marketing, and it’s a perfect fit for the fashion world.’
   The first prize sees the winning team profiled in a future issue of Lucire. If the winner is a New Zealand model, they will get a shoot led by the magazine’s fashion editor Sopheak Seng.
   Silkbody, Smashbox and Label M have also provided prizes. Silkbody’s prize can be redeemed internationally, while Smashbox and Label M’s prizes are for New Zealand only.
   The competition concludes on May 31.
   Promoki was one of the start-ups presenting at Lightning Lab’s Demo Day on May 15, and was introduced by Mr Yan.

Images
Click here to download image of Lucire cover
Lucire cover, issue 29
High-resolution JPEG, 1·26 Mbyte
Modelled by Laura Vandervoort
Photographer credit: Courtney Dailey

Jack Yan and Sopheak Seng
Lucire publisher Jack Yan and Lucire fashion editor Sopheak Seng with Lucire issue 28 (2012)
High resolution JPEG, 3·5 Mbyte
Photographed by Louise Hatton

Lucire
Lucire logo (for print use)
Adobe Illustrator 9·0 EPS, 75 kbyte
Rename filename suffix to .eps after downloading

Other images available at http://jyanet.com/press/photo.htm. A username and password are required.

About Promoki
Promoki.com hosts brand-sponsored photo and video contests and puts the outcomes into people’s social media feeds so that advertising becomes less interruptive, more effective, and more inspiring.

About Lucire
Lucire, the global fashion magazine (www.lucire.com), started on the web in 1997. In October 2004, it became the first magazine in its sector to extend its brand into a print magazine. By May 2005, it became the first web magazine to spawn international print editions. Lucire became the first fashion industry partner of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP, www.unep.org). It is headquartered in Wellington, New Zealand and published by Lucire LLC. For print edition information, see <http://www.lucire.net>.

About JY&A Media
JY&A Media, part of Jack Yan & Associates, publishes and licenses magazines, in print and on the web, and produces other interactive content. Best known among its titles is Lucire, the fashion magazine which launched online in 1997 and spawned international print editions in 2004. An internet pioneer, it has been publishing and creating online titles since the early 1990s. More on the company can be found at http://jyanet.com/media.

Notes to editors
Lucire is a registered trade mark of Jack Yan & Associates and subject to protection in certain jurisdictions. All other trade marks are the properties of their respective owners and are only used in a descriptive fashion without any intention to infringe.

Contacts
Jack Yan, Publisher
Lucire
T 64 4 387-3213, F 64 4 387-3213
E jack.yan@jyanet.com

Brinkley Warren, CEO
Promoki
T 64 21 160 4151
E brinkley@promoki.com

Leana Keen, Associate Editor, UK
Lucire
E leana.keen@lucire.com

Simone Knol
Lucire
C 44 7876 701-505
E simone.knol@lucire.com

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May 16, 2013   No Comments

Time to prove Wellington's mettle in light of PM's comments, says Yan

Wellington, May 7 (JY&A Media) Wellington mayoral candidate Jack Yan has responded to Prime Minister John Key’s earlier comments about the city ‘dying’.
   While he acknowledges that the Prime Minister has since quickly backtracked on his comments, he believes that Wellington has the right ingredients to be an economic and cultural leader.
   Mr Yan acknowledges that the capital’s economic growth is stagnant and that its population growth lags behind other major centres’, and that the Prime Minister has highlighted the distance between Wellington’s current political leadership and his own government.
   He states, ‘The PM would have seen that the ingredients that men like the late Sir Paul Callaghan believed could lead an export recovery are here. Innovative thinking, intellectual capital. We just haven’t nurtured it properly because we’ve entrusted same-again politicians to do the job.’
   He thanks the Prime Minister for raising a debate about what Wellington should be in the next half-century.
   ‘It’s election year, and it’s our opportunity to fix our problems,’ he says.
   ‘You’ll see from today’s reactions that there’s civic pride in Wellington, most likely because Wellingtonians see what I do: a more cultured, globally minded workforce that’s intelligent and savvy.’
   With Mr Key identifying Weta as one of the firms that have succeeded in Wellington, Mr Yan says, ‘We know Sir Peter Jackson’s not alone—because there are so many other innovators here, not necessarily in something as glamorous as film. They’re the backbone of our city’s economy.
   ‘You’ll also see that this identification with and sticking up for Wellington is the same energy that drives everything from trade to Olympic bids, more so than nation branding efforts have ever managed.’
   Mr Yan says his plans, if elected Mayor in October, ‘call for not only identifying and promoting those great firms that are innovative and socially responsible, but the use of my knowledge globally to do just what is needed for Wellington.’
   He also expects a better working relationship between the Mayor’s office and central government because of his record working with global firms at a high level.
   ‘It’s why in 2010, and again in 2013, I’ve made innovation a priority. Free wifi, which I proposed and we now have, was only a signal to say Wellington is open for business. The costs of extending it are relatively low. Pedestrianization, greening the CBD, and transportation improvements are needed—and we have the nous and the knowledge to get them done,’ he says.

Images
Images for this release may be downloaded from http://jyanet.com/press/photo.htm.

About Jack Yan
Jack Yan founded Jack Yan & Associates (http://jya.net), one of the world’s first virtual firms, in 1987, operating internationally. Among his company’s interests are business consulting, imaging, software and media, including the fashion magazine brand Lucire. He writes on topics, ranging from branding and business responsibility to fashion and typography, in numerous publications and journals worldwide and is a regular international speaker. He serves on the editorial board for The Journal of Brand Management. He has authored or co-authored numerous books, including Beyond Branding, Typography and Branding and, most recently, Nation Branding: Country Concepts and Cases. His personal site is at jackyan.com. He is a director of the Medinge Group (http://medinge.org), a think-tank in Sweden devoted to cutting-edge branding. He was one of the parties behind the successful bid for Miss Sweden in 2003 for Panos Emporio, and is general counsel of the Miss New Zealand Consortium, the New Zealand licensee for Miss Universe. Since 2006, he has been a mentor with Business Mentors New Zealand. In 2013, he announced his second bid for the mayoralty in Wellington, New Zealand, after netting 12 per cent of the vote on his first attempt.

Contacts
Jack Yan
T 64 4 387-3213
E jack.yan@jyanet.com

Hamish McConnochie
Campaign Media Manager
C 64 27 772-4391
E hamish@jackyanformayor.org

###

May 7, 2013   No Comments

Car encyclopædia Autocade hits 3,000,000 page views since launch

Wellington, May 6 (JY&A Media) Autocade (http://autocade.net), the car cyclopædia, has clocked up three million page views since its inception, according to its publishers.
    The website, which had started as a hobby, was inspired by the work of the late Michael Sedgwick, who had compiled an A–Z of cars sold in Great Britain between 1945 and 1970 for Classic and Sportscar in 1982–3. Originally devised as a wiki by its publisher Jack Yan, who had founded the fashion magazine Lucire, Autocade soon focused on models sold worldwide after 1970.
    Mr Yan was dissatisfied with the inaccuracies he found in Wikipedia, and the experiences he had had with the way that site was run. ‘The main problem with the English Wikipedia was that it was becoming increasingly US-centric, so everything was adjusted to the American viewpoint. That’s fine if it was set up as an American website—netizens happily browse to Edmunds or Consumer Guide—but the fact is the US does not always get certain car models earlier than other markets and I discovered more and more discrepancies.’
    Examples Mr Yan gives include Wikipedia’s insistence that the CE14 code applied to the 1983 Ford Tempo, when Ford had not even adopted its alphanumeric coding scheme at the time. (CE14 actually referred to the 1990 Ford Escort, with C denoting the car size and E denoting Europe—neither of which applied to the Tempo.) That error, he says, has now propagated all over the web.
    While he admits that Autocade is not perfect—their statistics show that each page is subject to 2·6 revisions—he believes that between him and Keith Adams, editor at Honest John in the UK—they have managed to avoid obvious errors.
    The website’s start in New Zealand, which no longer has a major domestic car production industry, helped the site maintain its fairness between nations.
    He and Mr Adams have been filling the gaps steadily over the last five years, starting with a handful of models in March 2008, getting to 500 in July of that year.
    The website is not meant to be exhaustive. As with Sedgwick, the duo provide a one-paragraph summary of each model, including body variants and engine sizes, and, given the web’s nature, links to its predecessor and successor where applicable.
    The global aspect arises when referring to international models. Rather than list the current Chevrolet Cruze under the name it bears in Europe, the original entry, made in 2008, is under Daewoo Lacetti (J300), following its name in its home market of Korea. Chevrolet Cruze is still listed as a nameplate, with a link back to the Lacetti’s model page, to aid European and other readers.
    Mr Yan says that this system makes Autocade more geographically neutral, and no country is favoured ahead of another.
    However, he and Mr Adams admit that they have put in their fair share of oddities out of a desire to catalogue rare models, including the Korean Camina of the 1970s (a facelifted Holden Torana), the Jaguar-based Rapport Forté of the early 1980s, all of the Citroën ZX-based Shanghai Maple models from China, and two current Renaults and a Škoda unique to India. Despite its largely post-1970 focus, a few older models have crept in for similar reasons, such as the Chrysler Esplanada, Regente and GTX of the late 1960s, which were based on the last French Fords and what became known as the Simca Vedette.
    So far, Autocade remains largely New Zealand and British in its team. Gateshead-based Peter Jobes had worked on Autocade’s back end, and, more recently, Melbourne-based New Zealand expat Nigel Dunn upgraded the site and moved it on to the cloud.

Images

Autocade website cover (full length), May 3, 2013
PNG, 658 kbyte

Images can also be downloaded at http://jyanet.com/press/photo.htm.

About JY&A Media
JY&A Media, part of Jack Yan & Associates, publishes and licenses magazines, in print and on the web, and produces other interactive content. Best known among its titles is Lucire, the fashion magazine which launched online in 1997 and spawned international print editions in 2004. An internet pioneer, it has been publishing and creating online titles since the early 1990s. More on the company can be found at http://jyanet.com/media.

Notes to editors
Autocade is a registered trade mark of Jack Yan & Associates and subject to protection in certain jurisdictions. All other trade marks are the properties of their respective owners and are only used in a descriptive fashion without any intention to infringe.

Contacts
Jack Yan, Publisher
Autocade
T 64 4 387-3213, F 64 4 387-3213
E jack.yan@jyanet.com

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May 3, 2013   No Comments